Suggested Reading

Posted On March 12, 2015 By | No Comments on Suggested Reading

Videos and books are a great tool with which to educate yourself and the public about hunger and homelessness. Listed below are movies, adult books, and even children’s books that focus on the issues of hunger and homelessness. [1]

Books for Adults

  • Kennedy, Michelle. Without a Net: Middle Class and Homeless (with Kids) in America, 2005.

At age 24 Michelle was suddenly single, homeless, and living out of a car with her three small children. She waitressed night shifts while her kids slept out in the diner’s parking lot. She saved her tips in the glove compartment, and set aside a few quarters every week for truck stop showers for her and the kids. With startling humor and honesty, Kennedy describes the frustration of never having enough money for a security deposit on an apartment—but having too much to qualify for public assistance.

  • Kozol, Jonathan. Rachel and Her Children: Homeless Families in America, 1987.

An unforgettable record of the desperate voices of men, women, and especially children caught up in a nightmarish situation that tears at the hearts of readers.

  • Reynalds, Jeremy. Homeless Culture and the Media: How the Media Educate Audiences in their Portrayal of Homeless Culture, 2006.

This book explores how the homeless are portrayed by the media and, consequently, how public perceptions of the homeless are shaped. By analyzing how the media informally educate their audiences, interviewing homeless people and journalists, and conducting content analysis of news stories, this research uncovers the reality that the issue of homelessness is not a media priority because it does not provide the requisite ratings boost.

  • Vissing, Yvonne. Out of Sight, Out Of Mind: Homeless Children and Families in Small-Town America, 1996.

Drawing on interviews with and case studies of 300 children and their families, with supporting statistics from federal, state, and private agencies, Vissing illustrates the impact this social problem has upon education, health, and the economy

Books for Children

  • Hubbard, Jim. Lives Turned Upside Down: Homeless Children in Their Own Words and Photographs, 1996.

A photographic essay, highlighted by firsthand accounts of life as a homeless child, captures the extraordinary and poignant worlds of four children from various parts of the country who are themselves living in that situation.

  • Vissing, Yvonne. Fly Away Home, 1991.

Kids explore what others in the world (including young people) have done and are doing to address the issues, find out what their community needs, and develop a service project. The workbook includes facts, quotations, real‐life examples, write‐ on pages, resources, a note to adults—and a lot of inspiration to get out there and make a difference in the world.

  • Kaye, Cathryn Berger. A Kids’ Guide to Hunger & Homelessness: How to Take Action!, 2007.

v  A photographic essay, highlighted by firsthand accounts of life as a homeless child, captures the extraordinary and poignant worlds of four children from various parts of the country who are themselves living in that situation.

  • Walters, Eric. Sketches, 2008.

After fleeing her suburban home, 15‐year‐old Dana struggles to survive in the alleys, squats, and subway stations of downtown Toronto. This gritty, honest portrayal of street life from acclaimed author Eric Walters is a testament to the healing power of art.

  • Upjohn, Rebecca. Lily and the Paper Man, 2007.

Walking with her mother on the way home from school one day, Lily runs straight into a gruff and untidy-looking man selling papers on the street. Frightened, Lily insists on taking the bus home every day for fear she will run into him again. But when the weather turns cold, Lily starts to see the Paper Man differently; she sees his bare toes through the holes in his boots and his thin shirt through the holes in his coat. As she lies in her warm bed at night, she wonders about the Paper Man and how he stays warm.



[1] Adapted from The National Coalition to End Homelessness

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